Bollinger Motors, Wabash join forces to bring electrified refrigerated truck to commercial customers

Industry

Electric vehicle startup Bollinger Motors said it’s developing an electrified refrigerated truck with trailer and truck body manufacturer Wabash.

The companies announced Wednesday that Wabash’s lightweight composite technology, called EcoNex Technology, will be combined with Bollinger’s electric chassis cab to create a Class 4 refrigerated truck. EcoNex reduces the amount of electricity needed to maintain cool temperatures, according to the statement.

“The all-electric truck we’re developing with Bollinger Motors will be highly efficient with more uptime and less charging compared to conventional construction,” Mark Ehrlich, Wabash’s vice president of new business development, said in a statement.

The joint effort offers customers weight savings and fleet electrification, according to the statement.

The refrigerated EV will act as last-mile transportation for consumer delivery, said Robert Bollinger, founder of Bollinger Motors.

A production time line was not given.

This is Bollinger’s second announcement this month after Mullen Automotive Inc. became its majority owner Sept. 7. Mullen spent $148.2 million on its 60 percent stake in Bollinger, of which Robert Bollinger remains CEO.

The suburban Detroit startup has focused on the electrification of trucks over the last seven years, according to CEO Bollinger. An electrified crossover and pickup dubbed B1 and B2, respectively, were put on hold earlier this year to focus on commercial EV fleet development.

Mullen’s multimillion-dollar investment will help Bollinger get its commercial EVs to production, Bollinger said.

Wabash was not available for comment.

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